Tag Archives:

campaign

Arcade Fire are mapping out the future of music videos – it’s truly awesome!

I am a little biased as i love Arcade Fire but if you read the full article here about the advanced music video hitting the internet, you don’t need to be a fan of the music to share your experience and the effect it has on you.




Visit thewildernessdowntown.com to check it out.

Coded in html5 and starring your childhood home, Arcade Fire have breathed new life into the medium. After all, why sit and watch when you can play?

If you’ve got a fancy computer – and don’t mind being reminded of your childhood home – chances are you have spent the morning mucking about with thewildernessdowntown.com. It’s described as a “musical experience made specifically for Google Chrome” that takes the Arcade Fire song We Used to Wait and pits it against scenes of your childhood home, rendered by Google maps. It’s got techy types in a tizz – not least because it’s a neat demonstration of some of the cooler tricks offered byhtml5, the next evolution in coding.

Charity ad ties up the medium and the message


Hand-drawn lettering supremo Alison Carmichael has been used to illustrate the message on this beautiful (and simple) ad for the White Ribbon Alliance who campaign for better healthcare for women in Africa. Creative Review has a short report here on the piece and a link to their previous profile on Alison.

Other charity initiatives… raffle off your celebrities!


Children with Leukaemia have launched a celebrity raffle, featuring prizes of meals supplied by nine of Britain’s best known chefs… In part supported by the Good Agency, who Macmillan have worked with in the past, this is generating publicity through the high profile names involved. Although this might seem an odd fit it will be interesting to see whether this fundraiser works, and how.
Website here with raffle tickets available until next week

Art / Commerce / Social Commentary /…


Canadian artist, Holly Norris, takes on American Apparel with a series of photos featuring disabled model Jes Sachse, entitled American Able. So what’s her purpose?

‘I chose American Apparel not just for their notable style, but also for their claims that many of their models are just ‘every day’ women who are employees, friends and fans of the company. However, these women fit particular body types. Their campaigns are highly sexualized and feature women who are generally thin, and who appear to be able-bodied.’

Indeed AA’s claim has been disputed on websites such as Jezebel which documents faces of AA as being professional models from high profile agencies such as Elite – challenging the public perception that they represent anything different from the commercial norm where women (and men) are commodified through unachievable body type promotion, at it’s most simple, and rejection of anyone outside of specific ‘social’ coda as undesirable.

‘Women with disabilities go unrepresented, not only in American Apparel advertising, but also in most of popular culture. Rarely, if ever, are women with disabilities portrayed in anything other than an asexual manner, for ‘disabled’ bodies are largely perceived as ‘undesirable.’

So, my marketing chums, do we, as a foward thinking organisation, challenge stereotypes or are we guilty of being part of the blah blah norm?

Check out this campaign – Kids Company

So anyway, over xmas I kept passing this outdoor campaign and didn’t really think too much of them. The layout’s alright, the photo’s alright, but you don’t really get what’s going on.

That was until I was walking past one on Mile End road. I had to do a double take because right behind it was the exact location as the photoshoot (check out the Shell garage in the background of one and the parking meter and sign for ‘hive’ on the other).

It’s a nice idea, it has the potential to really draw you in and get you to engage with the campaign. It’s just a shame that it’s not obvious enough (I like to think I’m fairly ad savvy, but it took me a fair few viewings to get it). Also, for such a targeted campaign, I’m not really sure why they picked Tower Hamlets as it’s one of the poorest boroughs in London?

There’s a lesson to be learnt here. KISS, Or ‘Keep It Simple Stupid’.

Ideas? Thoughts? Comments?

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